VITAMIN AND MINERAL GUIDE

The body needs vitamins and minerals to function well. And since your body can’t make vitamins and minerals on its own, you need to get them from your diet.

Here you will find an overview of which foods contain vitamins and minerals and what they are needed for.

Vitamins

Vitamin A (retinol)

Available in:
Meat (especially liver), fish, fish liver oil, eggs, milk and dairy products. Also found in fruits and vegetables, especially with orange and dark green colors, for example carrots, spinach, kale, apricots and melons.

Necessary for:
Vision, growth, immune system, dry skin, appetite and taste. In addition, for fetal organ development.

Vitamin B1 (thiamine)

Available in:
Cereals and pulses. In addition, meat (especially pork) and dairy products.

Necessary for:
The conversion of carbohydrates into glucose, which is important for the brain, heart and muscle function.

Vitamin B2 (riboflavin)

Available in:
Milk, cheese, eggs and meat. The highest levels of vitamin B2 are found in the liver and kidneys. The most important sources in the Danish diet are dairy products, whole grain products, meat, legumes and fish.

Necessary for:
Growth, skin, nails, hair, lips, tongue and eyesight.

Vitamin B3 (Niacin)

Available in:
Meat, fish, poultry and whole grain products.

Necessary for:
The conversion of proteins, fats and carbohydrates into energy in the body.

vitamin B6

Available in:
Lean meat, fish, poultry, vegetables, whole grain products and milk.

Necessary for:
Conversion and utilization of protein and fat and formation of genetic material.

vitamin B12

Available in:
Lean meat and fish, eggs and dairy products.

Necessary for:
The vitamin is essential for life. It is essential for the production of new red blood cells and for the optimal functioning of the nervous system.

Vitamin C

Citrus fruits, kiwis, berries (e.g. blackcurrants), tomatoes, cauliflower, new potatoes and green leafy vegetables are all good sources of vitamin C.

Necessary for:
Important for the body’s immune system, which protects against viruses and bacteria, among other things.

Vitamin D

Available in:
Oily fish such as mackerel, herring, eel, salmon, halibut and more. Vitamin D is also found in meat, milk, eggs and cheese, but in limited amounts.

Necessary for:
Increases the absorption of calcium from the intestinal system and is necessary for the calcium and phosphate metabolism of bones and teeth. Ensures balance in the immune system.

Vitamin E

Found in: fats, nuts, seeds, cereals, eggs (yolk), fish, cheese and milk.

Necessary for:
Protects the body’s cells from degradation. May stimulate the immune system.

Vitamin K

Available in:
Dark green leafy vegetables in particular, but also avocado, broccoli, cabbage, spinach and vegetable oils are good sources. Other sources are liver, kidney, dairy products, cereals, meat, egg yolk and fruit.

Necessary for:
The clotting process of blood and the formation of important proteins.

Folic acid

Available in:
Almost all foods, but the amount is particularly high in legumes, green vegetables and liver. In addition, whole grain cereals, vegetables, milk and cheese, and fruit.

Necessary for:
Beneficial for red blood cells and cell division.

Pantothenic acid

Available in:
Meat, whole grain products, broccoli, peas and beans are the best sources. In addition, milk, eggs, liver and legumes.

Necessary for:
The conversion of food into energy. Also benefits the nervous system and the production of hormones.

Minerals

Calcium

Available in:
Dairy products such as milk, acidified milk products and cheese, and in coarse vegetables such as broccoli and kale. Also found in small, fatty fish such as sardines.

Necessary for:
Strengthens bone tissue. Also important for muscle contraction, nerve impulse conduction, blood clotting, blood pressure and perhaps weight regulation.

Phosphorus

Available in:
Found in all foods as phosphorus is bound to protein. Meat, milk, cereals and pulses are good sources.

Necessary for:
Energy metabolism in the body. Building block for DNA and important for bones and muscles.

Iron

Available in:
Cereals, meat (including liver), fruit and vegetables (including broccoli).

Necessary for:
Iron is responsible for the transport of oxygen around the body and is therefore vital.

Iodine

Available in:
Almost all foods and drinks contain small amounts of iodine, but the everyday foods that contain the most iodine are: seafood, flour, eggs and vegetables.

Necessary for:
The production of thyroid hormone, which helps regulate the body’s metabolism.

Magnesium

Available in:
Everywhere in the diet. Green leafy vegetables, legumes, dark chocolate, nuts and whole grain products are rich in magnesium, while the primary dietary sources are cereals, milk and vegetables.

Necessary for:
Metabolism to function properly, the ability to use our muscles normally and the normal functioning of the heart.

Copper

Available in:
Meat (especially liver), wholemeal products, chocolate, dried fruit, mushrooms, nuts and shellfish. There is a low content in milk.

Necessary for:
Formation of hormones and signalling substances for use in the brain, nerves and adrenal glands. Protects against free radicals, which are harmful waste products of cell metabolism. Good for iron turnover in red blood cells.

Chrome

Available in:
Fish, processed meats, pulses, nuts, dark chocolate, whole grains, spices, brewer’s yeast, shellfish and more. It is necessary to eat a varied diet to cover your needs.

Necessary for:
The function of chromium is unknown. It was previously thought that chromium had an impact on glucose tolerance, the ability to metabolise carbohydrate as a “Glucose Tolerance Factor” that acts as an adjuvant to insulin. This means that chromium should help to keep blood sugar levels down.

Manganese

Available in:
Whole grains, nuts, green leafy vegetables and tea.

Necessary for:
Participates in the metabolism of carbohydrates and fats by neutralizing free radicals.

Molybdenum

Available in:
Found in legumes, nuts, eggs, dairy and cereal products.

Necessary for:
Important in sulphur and uric acid metabolism and may reduce the risk of tooth decay.

Selenium

Available in:
Fish, eggs and seafood are relatively good sources of selenium. Selenium is also found in meat, especially liver and kidney, as well as in milk, cheese and some nuts, especially Brazil nuts.

Necessary for:
May act as an antioxidant, protecting cells from destruction. Also important for the production of the hormone triiodothyronine, which contributes to a normal metabolism.

Zinc

Available in:
Meat, cheese, milk, whole grain products.

Necessary for:
Metabolic turnover. Has a stabilising effect on genetic systems and cell membranes. Important for the formation and growth of tissues and organs and for wound healing.

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